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A Comprehensive Wholefoods Cooking System Balancing 
Nutritional Quality & Taste, Convenience & Cost

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Food & Nutrition Quiz 
1. Kamut
    a) was an Egyptian Pharaoh.
   
b) is a grain grown in Montana.
    c) is a brand of cereal.

2. _________is an example of a hydrogenated fat.
    a) Butter
    b) Margarine
    c) Olive oil

3. If you order hot oatmeal in a restaurant it may taste flat because
    a) no sugar was added.
    b) no salt was added.
    c) it was cooked in a microwave.

4. Fruits and vegetables are usually considered as good sources of 
    a) protein.
    b) vitamins & minerals.
    c) unsaturated fats. 

5. Laurel's Kitchen is
    a) a tv cooking show.
    b) a new age cookbook.
    c) where Martha Stewart got her start.

6. Degenerative diseases are most closely associated with
    a) diets deficient in protein.
    b) affluent lifestyles.
    c) heredity.  

7. The "bottom line" in determining the quality of a recipe is
    a) nutritional value.
    b) taste testing.
    c) cost.

8. Eggs, milk, and meat are usually classified as good sources of 
    a) carbohydrates.
    b) protein. 
    c) fat.  

9. Who's recipes would taste best to the most people?
    a) Mother's
    b) Wolfgang Puck's
    c) Jane Brodie's

10. The human body and the food that fuels it came together as a consequence of
    a) chance, time, and circumstance
    b) the activity of an intelligent designer
    c) neither of the above

Answers  
1. Kamut
    a) was an Egyptian Pharaoh.
   
b) is a grain grown in Montana.
    c) is a brand of cereal.

Kamut® grain is grown in Montana and Canada as well. It was brought to the USA from Portugal in 1947, but its reputation didn't begin to spread until it was introduced at the National Health Food Exposition at Anaheim, California in 1987. Genetically it is a wheat but two studies have demonstrated that 70% of the people allergic to common wheats can tolerate kamut. The kamut story and its romantic connection to the pharaohs along with recipes are found in the Breakfasts cookbook.

2. _________is an example of a hydrogenated fat.
    a) Butter

   
b) Margarine

    c) Olive oil

 Hydrogenation adds an extra hydrogen molecule to give margarine a longer shelf life and to make it solid at room temperature. Some nutritionists say that this alternation is a nutritional negative. For an alternative see the Butter Spread recipe in the Breakfasts  cookbook. Some nonhydrogenated margarines are appearing in healthfood stores.

3. If you order hot oatmeal in a restaurant it may taste flat because
    a) no sugar was added.
   
b) no salt was added.
    c) it was cooked in a microwave.

The addition of a small amount of salt during cooking greatly enhances flavor and actually makes the oatmeal taste sweeter reducing the need to add extra sugar (we suggest honey or raisins.) Apparently the practice of leaving salt out of oatmeal and whole grain baked goods got its start a few years ago in response to inconclusive studies. Salt, it is now known, is a problem only for a small percentage of the population.

4. Fruits and vegetables are usually considered as good sources of 
    a) protein.
   
b) vitamins & minerals.
    c) unsaturated fats. 

All those colors indicate nutrients, vitamins and minerals. There's fiber, too. You've heard your mother's speech again and again. "Eat your ____ and ____." Fresh preferably.

5. Laurel's Kitchen is
    a) a tv cooking show.
   
b) a new age cookbook.
    c) where Martha Stewart got her start.    

Laurel's Kitchen is the cookbook bible of the new age health food movement. See Food Body Mind Spirit for a sample of her views.

6. Degenerative diseases are most closely associated with
    a) diets deficient in protein.
   
b) affluent lifestyles.
    c) heredity.  

It is the affluent in this world who can afford the rich, sweet, refined foods. They suffer from heart disease, cancer, diabetes etc.  People who live on traditional high fiber, low fat diets free of refined flour, refined sugar, and high fat tend to have lower incidences of these diseases.

7. The "bottom line" in determining the quality of a recipe is
    a) nutritional value.
   
b) taste testing.
    c) cost.

Good nutrition that doesn't get eaten doesn't help anyone. The secret to good taste is good recipes.

8. Eggs, milk, and meat are usually classified as good sources of 
    a) carbohydrates.
   
b) protein. 
    c) fat.  

People who get adequate calorie intake seldom suffer from a lack of protein which can come from dairy products and meat, as well as whole grains, beans and other sources.

9. Who's recipes would taste best to the most people?
   
a) Mother's
    b) Wolfgang Puck's
    c) Jane Brodie's

Mother's, of course. But my husband, bless him, definitely favors his wife's cooking. On the other hand, we'd have to admit that a lot of people gladly spend money at Wolfgang Puck's restaurants. Jane Brodie? She's a nutrition columnist for New York Times.

Chefs are the creative artists and nutritionists are the technicians who tend to focus on the nutritional numbers. The challenge is how to marry the two. Sometimes we succeed in doing just that in the SueGreggCookbooks. At least we like to think so,


Sue orders Butternut Squash Soup when she visits a Wolfgang Puck Cafe. You'll find her interpretation of this colorful, healthy, zippy soup in
Soups & Muffins.


10. The human body and the food that fuels it came together as a consequence of
    a) chance, time, and circumstance
   
b) the activity of an intelligent designer
    c) neither of the above

Currently this is an area of considerable controversy. See why in Food Body Mind Spirit.

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